Hibri Marzook Musings on technology and occsionally photography

Continuous Delivery culture, not tools – Notes from an Open Space session

I facilitated an open space session at the Pipeline Conference in London, to discuss focussing on a  culture of Continuous Delivery (CD) than the tools. We listed a few of the anti-patterns seen in the wild

Culture not tools 

  • The CD guy.
  • Devops person
  • The team not owning CD.
  • Too much standardisation. One person writes the rulebook and forced on every team.
  • No culture of change. The delivery pipeline and code is fixed. No one touches it.
  • No culture of learning.
  • Too much focus on the technology.
  • Cherry picking practices and missing the connection between practices.

We then discussed how to communicate CD, without using  technical terminology, and use language that the rest of the organisation understands. Especially in terms that senior management can relate to.

Techies do a bad job of communicating the process of building software. Don’t mention TDD, CD, Devops when talking to management. Learn to talk in terms of business goals.  Adaptive thinking,  story telling and impact mapping are good tools to have.

Communication

Anthony Green described a pyramid of skills/terms to use when talking about CD.

Pyramid of skills

Techies start at the apex of the pyramid when talking about CD and doing a CD transformation. Instead we should take ideas from the human sciences to involve non-technical people in the process.

Individuals learn, but organisations are bad at learning. How to build a culture of learning across the organisation ? How does the organisation learn ?  In most organisations failure is penalised.

Learning

There were many suggestions to improve organisational learning.

  • Empowering, remove shackles.
  • No job titles. Titles restrict employees. However, titles are useful for HR. Is HR useful ?
  • Culture interviews.
  • Get better at recruitment. Pair programming interviews. Grow people.

We discussed a few techniques to learn agile practices without the tools and technology.  Agile games such as the Lean Lego Game and the Kanban Pizza Game help introduce the CD thinking without getting mired in technical discussions. [I facilitated an open space session at the Pipeline Conference in London, to discuss focussing on a  culture of Continuous Delivery (CD) than the tools. We listed a few of the anti-patterns seen in the wild

Culture not tools 

  • The CD guy.
  • Devops person
  • The team not owning CD.
  • Too much standardisation. One person writes the rulebook and forced on every team.
  • No culture of change. The delivery pipeline and code is fixed. No one touches it.
  • No culture of learning.
  • Too much focus on the technology.
  • Cherry picking practices and missing the connection between practices.

We then discussed how to communicate CD, without using  technical terminology, and use language that the rest of the organisation understands. Especially in terms that senior management can relate to.

Techies do a bad job of communicating the process of building software. Don’t mention TDD, CD, Devops when talking to management. Learn to talk in terms of business goals.  Adaptive thinking,  story telling and impact mapping are good tools to have.

Communication

Anthony Green described a pyramid of skills/terms to use when talking about CD.

Pyramid of skills

Techies start at the apex of the pyramid when talking about CD and doing a CD transformation. Instead we should take ideas from the human sciences to involve non-technical people in the process.

Individuals learn, but organisations are bad at learning. How to build a culture of learning across the organisation ? How does the organisation learn ?  In most organisations failure is penalised.

Learning

There were many suggestions to improve organisational learning.

  • Empowering, remove shackles.
  • No job titles. Titles restrict employees. However, titles are useful for HR. Is HR useful ?
  • Culture interviews.
  • Get better at recruitment. Pair programming interviews. Grow people.

We discussed a few techniques to learn agile practices without the tools and technology.  Agile games such as the Lean Lego Game and the Kanban Pizza Game help introduce the CD thinking without getting mired in technical discussions. ](https://twitter.com/matthewpskelton) is doing interesting work in this area, with a workshop to experience devops and a collaborative culture at http://web.experiencedevops.org/ .

Everyone should read [I facilitated an open space session at the Pipeline Conference in London, to discuss focussing on a  culture of Continuous Delivery (CD) than the tools. We listed a few of the anti-patterns seen in the wild

Culture not tools 

  • The CD guy.
  • Devops person
  • The team not owning CD.
  • Too much standardisation. One person writes the rulebook and forced on every team.
  • No culture of change. The delivery pipeline and code is fixed. No one touches it.
  • No culture of learning.
  • Too much focus on the technology.
  • Cherry picking practices and missing the connection between practices.

We then discussed how to communicate CD, without using  technical terminology, and use language that the rest of the organisation understands. Especially in terms that senior management can relate to.

Techies do a bad job of communicating the process of building software. Don’t mention TDD, CD, Devops when talking to management. Learn to talk in terms of business goals.  Adaptive thinking,  story telling and impact mapping are good tools to have.

Communication

Anthony Green described a pyramid of skills/terms to use when talking about CD.

Pyramid of skills

Techies start at the apex of the pyramid when talking about CD and doing a CD transformation. Instead we should take ideas from the human sciences to involve non-technical people in the process.

Individuals learn, but organisations are bad at learning. How to build a culture of learning across the organisation ? How does the organisation learn ?  In most organisations failure is penalised.

Learning

There were many suggestions to improve organisational learning.

  • Empowering, remove shackles.
  • No job titles. Titles restrict employees. However, titles are useful for HR. Is HR useful ?
  • Culture interviews.
  • Get better at recruitment. Pair programming interviews. Grow people.

We discussed a few techniques to learn agile practices without the tools and technology.  Agile games such as the Lean Lego Game and the Kanban Pizza Game help introduce the CD thinking without getting mired in technical discussions. [I facilitated an open space session at the Pipeline Conference in London, to discuss focussing on a  culture of Continuous Delivery (CD) than the tools. We listed a few of the anti-patterns seen in the wild

Culture not tools 

  • The CD guy.
  • Devops person
  • The team not owning CD.
  • Too much standardisation. One person writes the rulebook and forced on every team.
  • No culture of change. The delivery pipeline and code is fixed. No one touches it.
  • No culture of learning.
  • Too much focus on the technology.
  • Cherry picking practices and missing the connection between practices.

We then discussed how to communicate CD, without using  technical terminology, and use language that the rest of the organisation understands. Especially in terms that senior management can relate to.

Techies do a bad job of communicating the process of building software. Don’t mention TDD, CD, Devops when talking to management. Learn to talk in terms of business goals.  Adaptive thinking,  story telling and impact mapping are good tools to have.

Communication

Anthony Green described a pyramid of skills/terms to use when talking about CD.

Pyramid of skills

Techies start at the apex of the pyramid when talking about CD and doing a CD transformation. Instead we should take ideas from the human sciences to involve non-technical people in the process.

Individuals learn, but organisations are bad at learning. How to build a culture of learning across the organisation ? How does the organisation learn ?  In most organisations failure is penalised.

Learning

There were many suggestions to improve organisational learning.

  • Empowering, remove shackles.
  • No job titles. Titles restrict employees. However, titles are useful for HR. Is HR useful ?
  • Culture interviews.
  • Get better at recruitment. Pair programming interviews. Grow people.

We discussed a few techniques to learn agile practices without the tools and technology.  Agile games such as the Lean Lego Game and the Kanban Pizza Game help introduce the CD thinking without getting mired in technical discussions. ](https://twitter.com/matthewpskelton) is doing interesting work in this area, with a workshop to experience devops and a collaborative culture at http://web.experiencedevops.org/ .

Everyone should read](http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/0712678867/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1634&creative=19450&creativeASIN=0712678867&linkCode=as2&tag=hibrinet-21 “Maverick”) by Ricardo Semler.

Matthew also highlighted how we are good at spotting bad software architecture, but don’t spot queues and bottlenecks in organisational culture.  The sketch below would be recognised as having a bottleneck if it was a software system, but can we spot the bottleneck if this was an org chart ?

Queues

 

At the end, there was consensus that it all comes down to having good people.

Thanks to everyone who attended the open space session. Most of all to the conference organisers for putting together a well organised, and very thought-provoking event.

By Hibri Marzook

Discuss this post with me on @hibri